Palo Corona Regional Park, Carmel Valley

BRIEF SUMMARY Starting at Highway 1, the trails of Palo Corona venture through bucolic sublime that knows no greater measure. The perfect farm house, cows that welcome walkers with a nod, views of Carmel Valley and a lookout over the Pacific Coast from Point Lobos to Pebble Beach. The trails are friendly and the views are plentiful.


Trip Planning
TRAIL INFORMATION
Distance: 2.6 miles Round Trip (There are a lot of small loops available to extend your hike)
Cumulative Elevation: 810ft
High Point: 850ft
Low Point: 40ft
GENERAL INFORMATION
Location: Palo Corona Regional Park, Monterey Peninsula Regional Park District
Description: Starting at Highway 1, the trails of Palo Corona venture through bucolic sublime that knows no greater measure. The perfect farm house, cows that welcome walkers with a nod, views of Carmel Valley and a lookout over the Pacific Coast from Point Lobos to Pebble Beach. The trails are friendly and the views are plentiful.
Permit/Fees: Hours: Daytime

Free Online Permit Application: Permit

Access Permit applications are processed via the MPRPD website from Monday thru Friday, excluding holidays, 10:00 am until 2:00 pm. Applications are processed on a first in, first out basis. Permits will be issued a maximum of 30 days in advance of the requested permit date. It is recommended that applications be submitted at least 2 weekdays prior to the requested visit date.
Contact: General Number: (831) 372-3196 (Press "2" for Palo Corona Permits)
On Duty Ranger: (831) 659-4488
Water: None
Bathrooms: There are porta potties behind the barn.
Address: See Google Map (Shoulder of Highway 1, about 200 yards South of the Carmel River Bridge)
Parking: See Google Map (From the Monterey Peninsula, take Highway 1 south past Rio Road intersection (4-way signal light) in Carmel. Proceed south-bound over the Carmel River Bridge approximately 200 yards. Parking is allowed on the east-side Highway 1 road shoulder (on the left). Make the left-hand turn into the park entrance driveway. Pull forward onto the Highway 1 road shoulder.)
Book: Please send recommendations.
Map: Please send recommendations.
Additional Info: Make sure and check out the Big Sur Land Trust website to learn more about how they are expanding public lands: BigSurLandTrust.org
GOOGLE MAP
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4 comments:

  1. Great video! FYI:
    1) I think the ranger number you provided is only good on the weekends for last-minute reservations.
    2) There are porta potties behind the barn.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Katie, thanks for the info. I added both.

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  3. An agreement to protect four federally listed species of plants and animals in the 4,300-acre Palo Corona Regional Park south of Carmel has been forged between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Monterey Peninsula Regional Park District.

    The Safe Harbor Agreement was developed by Fish and Wildlife, the Nature Conservancy and the park district to provide a 30-year management agreement to benefit the

    The Service, the regional park district, and The Nature Conservancy worked collaboratively to develop a 30-year agreement that identifies management activities that would threatened California red-legged frog and California tiger salamander as well as the endangered Smith's blue butterfly and Yadon's piperia in the park.

    Under a Safe Harbor Agreement, non-federal landowners voluntarily undertake management activities on their property that would provide a net conservation benefit to species listed under the federal Endangered Species Act, such as enhancing, restoring, or maintaining habitat for the listed species while continuing current land-use practices, such as cattle grazing.

    In return for voluntary conservation commitments, a permit associated with the Safe Harbor Agreement authorizes incidental take of listed species that may result from actions described in the agreement and guarantees landowners t will not be subject to property-use restrictions if they increase the number of listed species on their property. At the end of the agreement period landowners
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    may return their property to the baseline conditions that existed at the beginning of the Safe Harbor Agreement.

    The Safe Harbor Agreement for Palo Corona Regional Park outlines ways the park district can promote the conservation of the four species by creating, restoring, enhancing, and maintaining ponds for California red-legged frogs and California tiger salamanders, controlling nonnative grasses to enhance shrub habitat on about 1,400 acres of coastal terrace prairie grasslands for Smith's blue butterflies, and controlling nonnative vegetation in areas occupied by Yadon's piperia.

    The regional park district will continue its ranching, public recreation, and park maintenance activities.

    ReplyDelete